Newer Hepatitis C Drugs Linked to Liver Damage – HepatitisC.net

A report issued January 25, 2017 by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) has found that some of the newer drugs used to treat hepatitis C may put patients at risk for liver failure. The report is based on an analysis of 12 months of adverse events (side effects from drugs) reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from use of nine antiviral drugs from doctors around the world.What did the research show?The ISMP report found 524 incidences of liver failure associated with the drugs, and 165 of those 524 patients died from their liver failure. Another 1,058 patients had reports of severe liver injury. This report comes just after the FDA issued additional safety precautions in October 2016 of using these drugs in people with both hepatitis C and hepatitis B infections. The ISMP report states that while the antiviral drugs appear to suppress the hepatitis C virus, the treatment opens to the door to the reactivation of the hepatitis B virus. All of the 524 cases of liver failure included the direct-acting antiviral drugs, often in combination with each other or with ribavirin. In addition, the report found 761 cases in which the antivirals failed to work.While the findings from the ISMP report show the need for additional research on the safety of these drugs, the report doesn’t give detailed information on the patients. These medications are approved for hepatitis C, a condition that already affects the liver. It is not clear whether the liver damage and liver failure cases would have existed whether or not the patients were treated with the antivirals.1-2

Source: Newer Hepatitis C Drugs Linked to Liver Damage – HepatitisC.net

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