Whom Do You Tell When You’re Sick? Maybe Everyone You Know – NYTimes.com

With these qualifications, Dr. Wicks comes down strongly in favor of disclosure. His reason: You never know where you can learn something that might save your life.“As a doctor, I used to give patients nuggets of wisdom,” he said, adding, “But I can’t meet every patient.”When patients seek out others with similar illnesses, their knowledge grows exponentially. “It’s more scalable, less serendipitous,” he said.Even my mother, when she broke down and divulged her operation to a friend, who happened to have the same condition, radically changed her course of treatment.Dr. Wicks’s research shows that patients who participate in peer groups have learned tips about drug sequencing or little-known specialists that proved critical to their care.“The value of a tweet-length piece of information can be the difference between life and death,” he said.

Source: Whom Do You Tell When You’re Sick? Maybe Everyone You Know – NYTimes.com

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